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In 1933, workmen, whilst digging the foundations for the Callendar Riggs Bus Station, uncovered a jar containing Roman coins. The jar was sealed with a fragment of fabric, which was said to be the earliest known form of tartan. The post to the right of the photo below roughly marks the place where it was found. Hoard and Tartan are now kept at the National Museum of Scotland, Chambers St, Edinburgh (NS 8922 7992). A dating test revealed that the jar was buried after the Romans left the UK and that the woven fabric had been made from the natural, undyed wool of Soay sheep.

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“Right is of no sex, truth is of no colour, God is the father of us all, and we are all Brethren.”                         Frederick Douglass’ motto from his weekly publication the North Star.

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As Scotland’s Garden and Landscape Heritage (SGLH) Chairman I am very proud to present this story about Powfoulis Estate by Marilyn Scott, volunteer on the Glorious Gardens team assigned by SGLH to the recording of non-inventory designed landscapes and gardens in the Falkirk area. The Glorious Gardens project was launched in Falkirk in 2015 and was funded by Historic Environment Scotland. This is one of the 16 sites covered by SGLH in this area. A similar project was carried out in the Clyde and Avon Valley, and we are currently planning a third phase, which will focus on sites in East Lothian. For more details, please go to https://www.sglh.org.

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